In the Garden (segment two)

As men and women grew up, they married each other in order to fulfill God’s command to multiply and moved into other areas near the garden, creating new towns.  The newly married taught their children to play with the utmost courtesy and respect since they were always mindful of the needs of others.  For the longest time, they did not know what an argument or serious disagreement was. Living in such idyllic conditions caused them to be just a little lax about certain conditions that God had laid down.  They began to take life for granted.

After all, it’s not everyone who can live in paradise, have no need for clothes or to cook food or worry about anything at all.  Everything had been provided for them because God loved them so much and not once did the man and woman ever imagine a life outside the garden.

Until one day, a serpent sidled up to the woman.

“Hey, woman,” said the serpent coyly.  “How are things going today?”

“Hello, serpent.  Things are going just fine,” said the woman, slightly annoyed.

“You don’t sound like they’re just fine.  Want to talk about it?” asked the serpent.

“Well, I’ve run out of ideas for dinner.  We seem to keep eating the same things over and over again.  Adam doesn’t complain, but I’d really like to serve him something different for a change.”

“Oh,” said the serpent smiling.  “I thought you had a real problem.”

“This is a real problem,” said the woman.  She had her hands on her hips and was about to walk away.

“Don’t leave.  I was just teasing,” said the serpent with a twinkle in his eye.

“And just why should I stay here talking to you when you don’t understand my dilemma? It’s easy enough for you to find a variety of food; you can travel all over the place at ease.  Besides that, you probably don’t have any taste any way,” said the woman carefully scrutinizing the serpent.

“I meant no harm and besides, I know what you can do for a change for dinner.  You know that tree over by the other side of the garden, have you tried that fruit yet?” he sidled up a little closer.  I had some the other day and man was it ever delicious.  You really ought to try it.  I’m sure your family would love it.”

“Are you referring to the tree in the middle of the garden?” she asked skeptically.  “The one we were told not to eat from?”

“Well, surely the big guy didn’t mean you could never eat from it.  Perhaps He was just saving the best for last.”

“Oh, no!  He specifically said that we were neither to eat from it nor touch it or we would surely die,” she responded hastily.